My work is to cultivate a spirit of (re)membering in the lives of Black women educators and educational professionals pre-K thru higher education. I am committed to opening a space for Black people (and those who love us) so that we can all (re)member the brilliant humanity, history and culture of African people.

Through intense study, meaningful heritage experiences, keen attention to spirit in education, my work is to educate and (re)member full circle, from the continent of Africa to our African diaspora and back again.

People Are Talking About Dr. Dillard’s Impact…

“Dr. Dillard brings to Seattle U and the College of Education a wealth of experience as a proven leader. She has served in a number of key academic posts in higher education, including, among others, Chair of the Department of Educational Theory and Practice at the University of Georgia and Associate Dean for Equity and Diversity at The Ohio State University. Dr. Dillard’s belief in the transformative power of education so clearly evident in her work as an accomplished teacher-scholar is matched by her commitment to serving others and making an impact in communities near and far.”

Stephen V. Sundborg, S.J., Former President, Seattle University

“Now my students need to be able to go to Ghana or the Dominican Republic or Brazil.  Anywhere in the diaspora, just so they can see people of power who look like them and can understand the connection and the histories.  They need to see that…In Ghana, it was when like all of those connections became real for me…And I am living that spirit because of it.”

Ghana Study Abroad in Education Student Participant, University of Georgia

“I truly enjoyed Dr. Dillard! It was evident from day one that she cared about us as students and human beings. I appreciated how she treated the course as a discussion and helped address concerns we had about the writing process. She provided “insider” knowledge not often shared by other academics because she wanted us to be successful. I enjoyed the times we were able to collaboratively analyze pieces of writing together, such as proposals and comps. I also appreciated how you would always elicit our thoughts first before discussing your own so we could feel empowered when doing this work.”

Doctoral Student, University of Georgia

“The content for this class was invaluable for me in giving me an understanding of Black feminist theory and how it was evolved, literally over time. I appreciated that Dr. Dillard started with the continent of Africa, and traced a lineage of Black female understandings and thought over time in this way. Everything we read for this class allowed me to begin to understand how white and western worldviews, understandings, and ways of accessing knowledge compare and connect with Black feminist epistemologies. This was helpful for me as an educator who has worked and will continue to work with racially diverse students.”

Doctoral Student, University of Georgia

“Dr. Dillard demonstrates that it is, in fact, possible to embody and live in and through one’s work. In fact, that it is possible—necessary, even—to live and be one’s work.”

“Dr. Dillard demonstrates that it is, in fact, possible to embody and live in and through one’s work. In fact, that it is possible—necessary, even—to live and be one’s work.”

Dr. Esther Ohito, Rutgers University

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